Search Results for: sapienza

WJCT Live at JU Friday! First Coast Connect On the Go!

Don’t miss a special live broadcast of the popular WJCT radio show “First Coast Connect” from the Jacksonville University Marine Science Research institute at 9 a.m. Friday! This is a great chance to hear as host Melissa Ross discusses the exciting developments, cross-disciplinary research and close-to-market programs occurring at JU.

Listen on the radio, or click http://news.wjct.org/programs/first-coast-connect and see your Internet listening options on the right side of the page.

The expected guest lineup over the course of the hour includes:

  • JU President Tim Cost speaking on new facilities, upgrades and other exciting developments at JU, accompanied by Student Association President Will Baxley.
  • JU MSRI Executive Director Quinton White discussing the new state-of-the-art floating classroom for students dedicated last Friday, plus the Institute’s cutting-edge research and details on its unique partnerships with the St. Johns Riverkeeper and Florida Fish and Wildlife in its riverfront building.
  • JU College of Health Sciences Associate Dean Christine Sapienza on JU’s new Speech-Pathology program and the COHS’ innovative research efforts that have landed more than $1.2 million in recent grants for JU. She and Dr. Juan Merkt of the Davis Aviation Center will also offer an update on an exciting proposed research grant for JU’s Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. It will partner with the Davis Aviation Center to answer questions related to pilots’ ability to act and communicate in noisy conditions.
  • JU Music Chair Dr. Tommy Harrison and Dr. Michael James Olson, Assistant Professor of Music, who will talk about the University’s music business program, which is on the front-edge of new innovations in the discipline, including a renewed focus on educational/industry opportunities and partnerships.
  • And if you listen closely, you may hear some original music by Dr. Harrison in between segments!

Sapienza, DiFino of JU’s Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders invited as speech panelists

Dr. Christine Sapienza, JU College of Health Sciences Associate Dean,  and Dr. Sharon M. DiFino, Assistant Professor of Speech and Language Pathology, have been invited to speak on two separate upcoming conference panels.

JU's Dr. Sharon DiFino

 

DiFino has been accepted to speak at the 2014 Florida Conference of Historians annual meeting in St. Augustine Jan. 31-Feb. 1. She will act as both chair and presenter for the panel: “One Hundred Years of Health Care: From Europe to America.”

Specifically, DiFino, who is also a member of the International Academy of Research in Learning Disabilities, will discuss “Stuttering Treatments in Europe: A Case Study of Henry Freund, Co-Founder of the Stuttering Foundation of America.”

 

 

 

JU Prof. Christine Sapienza

Sapienza will speak at the 22nd Annual Dysphagia Research Society in Nashville in March. The DRS conference is designed for clinicians, researchers and physicians who take care of patients with swallow disorders.

Sapienza is on the 2014 faculty list of presenters and will be a panelist March 5, 2013  discussing well-used treatments for swallowing, including the expiratory muscle strength training program she developed. Sapienza represents the JU College of Health Sciences and Brooks Rehabilitation Hospital at this international conference gathering of specialists.

For more on the College of Health Sciences, visit http://www.ju.edu/COHS.

JU’s Dr. Sapienza presents at American Speech Language and Hearing Association conference

Dr. Christine Sapienza, College of Health Sciences Associate Dean, recently attended the American Speech Language and Hearing Association conference in Chicago.  She presented to more than 150 participants on the intervention technique called respiratory muscle strength training as an invited workshop speaker.

JU Prof. Christine Sapienza

Dr. Sapienza was joined with her colleagues Dr. Bari Ruddy from the University of Central Florida and Dr. Susan Baker from Miami University of Ohio. Dr. Ruddy and Dr. Baker are former doctoral students, and together with Dr. Sapienza have been studying respiratory muscle strength training and treating patients with a variety of diseases including Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis and upper airway disorders.

For more information on this national conference, visit www.ASHA.org or email Dr. Sapienza at csapien@ju.edu for details on the presented work.

JU College of Health Sciences wins $141,659 federal grant to help rural veterans with respiratory/swallow disorders

Jacksonville University’s College of Health Sciences has added to recent grant awards by receiving $141,659 from the Department of Veterans Affairs to help in the care of rural veterans with respiratory and swallow disorders.

Continuing to build on its scientific and clinical initiatives, the JU College of Health Sciences will act as a research partner with the Malcom Randall VA Medical Center in Gainesville in the project, which is titled “Rural Veterans TeleRehabilitation Initiative – Respiration, Eating and Swallowing Program (RVTRI-RESP).”

In part, it involves using in-home monitoring, including video links, to aid veterans with swallow/respiratory dysfunction who otherwise might face long travel distances to receive proper care, said Dr. Christine Sapienza, associate dean of the JU CHS and professor of communication sciences and disorders.

Dr. Gloria McKee Lopez

Dr. Gloria McKee-Lopez, associate dean of the School of Nursing who will serve as principal investigator for JU, said she was excited to partner with the Malcom Randall center and grant consultant Sapienza, who specializes in speech-language pathology, to optimize the care of veterans in the RVTRI-RESP project.

“Our interdisciplinary efforts are timely, as nursing and speech pathology share common interests in providing innovative solutions to improve patient care outcomes for the rural health veteran population we will be serving,” Sapienza said.

The project, funded through the Office of Rural Health in the VA’s Veterans Health Administration, is important because rural veterans with swallow/respiratory problems can be underserved. Travel time and distance to get specialty care can combine with anxiety and depression and impaired physical functioning to create barriers, Sapienza noted.

In-home video telehealth monitoring helps with early detection and intervention, which can greatly decrease office and emergency room visits and hospital stay lengths, decrease veterans’ travel time and expenses, increase patient compliance and give care-providers clinically relevant information in real time – all of which can lead to a better quality of life for veterans, she said.

Dr. Christine Sapienza

“This project represents the connections established between our research partners in the VA health care system in Gainesville and the interdisciplinary richness of nursing, speech pathology, respiratory physiology and rehabilitation medicine,” Sapienza said. “The grant focus is contemporary and necessary to ensure that rural health patients have access to the assessment and intervention protocols we are developing as a group. We look forward to our continuing partnership and academic growth with the VA healthcare system.”

The funding comes on the heels of an $870,000 U.S. Department of Health grant to recruit hundreds more student veterans to JU’s Nursing program, and a $190,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the role of coughing in protecting the airways of patients with swallowing disorders.

Helping the CHS faculty with their writing efforts is a three-year grant from the Riverside Hospital Foundation that underwrites a majority of a full-time grant writer’s salary, a position dedicated  to the development of the CHS and its programs. The Riverside Hospital Foundation was a catalyst in helping JU grow its existing health care programming to form the  College of Health Sciences.  Its vision to fund the dedicated grant writer position enabled the CHS to pursue timely funding  opportunities.

For more information on the JU College of Health Sciences, visit http://www.ju.edu/cohs.

JU’s Dr. Christine Sapienza to speak at Brooks Rehabilitation Fifth Annual Research Day Oct. 23.

JU College of Health Sciences Associate Dean Dr. Christine Sapienza will be a guest speaker at the Brooks Rehabilitation Fifth Annual Research Day Oct. 23.

JU Prof. Christine Sapienza

Sapienza, who specializes in speech-language pathology, will discuss “Twenty Years and Counting: Voice and Airway Protection and Therapies.”

To sign up for the event, visit: https://brookshealth-greenlight.silkroad.com. For more information, contact Jodi.morgan@brooksrehab.org or call (904) 345-8987.

The meeting’s full agenda is below:

JU Speech Pathology prep courses now online for Spring 2014!

Courses are now online at Jacksonville University for those who are planning careers as speech-language pathologists. The primary goal is to develop professionals who are knowledgeable and skilled in the assessment, diagnosis and treatment of speech, voice, swallowing language and cognitive disorders with emphasis on the practice of medical speech-language pathology. Under the direction of experienced faculty, students will begin to gain the skills needed to assess and treat individuals with diverse needs.

The graduate-level SLP program is in the final development stages for a planned enrollment of fall 2014. For those students who wish to prepare for this program, the SLP online preparation program provides the necessary
pre-requisites. This program will be available January of 2014.

For more information, contact Dr. Christine Sapienza at csapien@ju.edu. For Admissions questions, contact Diana Peaks, Director for ADP and Graduate Admissions, at (904) 256-7245, dpeaks@ju.edu.

SEND APPLICATION MATERIALS TO:

Jacksonville University Adult & Graduate Admission
2800 University Blvd. N. Jacksonville, FL 32211
Phone: 1.800.225.2027
APPLY ONLINE NOW at ju.edu/admissions/

CAA Site Visit Dec. 2-3 for JU Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders

The Council on Academic Accreditation will visit the Jacksonville University Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders on Dec. 2-3, 2013, to conduct a Level 2 Readiness review of the application for accreditation for the master’s program in speech-language pathology. Faculty members, administrators, students, community professionals and the public are invited to address the CAA visitors at 5 p.m. Dec. 2 in the Lazzara Health Sciences Center Community Room, 2800 University Blvd. N., Jacksonville. For more information, contact Dr. Christine Sapienza, JU College of Health Sciences, (904) 256-7626, csapien@ju.edu.

JU College of Health Sciences Drs. Sapienza, DiFino lend support to Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center

JU Drs. Sharon DiFino, left, and Christine Sapienza

Jacksonville University Profs. Christine Sapienza (right in photo) and Sharon DiFino, JU speech pathology faculty in the College of Health Sciences, attended FinFest on the River 2013 on Sept. 28 with guests of JU President Tim Cost, to support the Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center’s annual fundraiser. The tropical-themed event was a special evening at the Timuquana Country Club to benefit children, adults and seniors in Northeast Florida who are in need of speech, language and/or hearing needs. Go Dolphins for supporting such a wonderful event and recognizing the tremendous efforts of the Jacksonville Speech and Hearing Center.

JU’s Dr. Christine Sapienza brings $190,000 NIH grant to JU College of Health Sciences, Brooks Rehabilitation

JU’s College of Health Sciences has received a nearly $190,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders to assist with finishing a four-year study evaluating just how crucial a role coughing plays in protecting the airways of patients with swallowing disorders.

JU Prof. Christine Sapienza

The NIH-funded grant focuses on patients with Parkinson’s disease who develop dysphagia, or swallowing problems. It is estimated that as many as 22 percent of people in the U.S. 50 and older may have some form of dysphagia, according to clinical reports.

The JU study will specifically look at the relationship between how well patients with Parkinson’s disease cough and how well they swallow. The study will be completed in partnership with speech language pathology at Brooks Rehabilitation Hospital starting in October 2013. It will be done in continued scientific partnership with University of Florida faculty member Dr. Michael Okun in the College of Medicine/Neurology and Public Health and Health Professions faculty member Dr. Giselle Mann.

Brooks Rehabilitation serves patients with neurologic and neurodegenerative disorders in both inpatient and outpatient settings.

Dysphagia in particular is life-threatening in Parkinson’s disease because it can lead to aspiration pneumonia. In fact, the death rate from these disorders can approach 4 out of 10 patients. It is critical that if the airway becomes impaired during swallowing/eating that a patient can clear it out to prevent the possibility of aspiration pneumonia from infection. Clearing the airway occurs with coughing and coughing strong.

“This project is significant because it may provide us with new tools that can be used to effectively assess cough function in a non-invasive and cost effective manner,” said Dr. Christine Sapienza, the grant’s project leader, associate dean of the JU CHS and professor of communication sciences and disorders.  “This tool, in combination with existing and valid methods for screening swallow function, may assist us in gathering a more complete picture of both preventative (swallow) and corrective (cough) airway protective behaviors to guide subsequent treatment recommendations.”

The National Institute of Health mission is to seek fundamental knowledge about the nature and behavior of living systems and the application of that knowledge to enhance health, lengthen life, and reduce illness and disability.

Funding through the NIH and other federal agencies allows JU faculty to promote the highest goals of science while applying methods that will ultimately protect and improve health.

Faculty can find federal grant opportunities at Grants.gov (http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/home.html;jsessionid=XT1fSGZHcmzNKdsksJy0fjQBzVj2WtD0RVmQ4yQ9TYvNVGwhmdQ2). They can also sign up for inbox delivery of federal opportunities based on criteria specific to their areas of interest/expertise by visiting http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/manage-subscriptions.html.

For more on the JU College of Health Sciences, visit http://ju.edu/cohs.

 

 

 

JU’s Kimberly Beasley, Dr. Christine Sapienza to speak at voice teacher symposium Oct. 19

JU Prof. Kimberly Beasley

JU Prof. Christine Sapienza

About 15 local high school and university teachers are expected at a National Association of Teachers of Singing North Florida Chapter Symposium Oct. 19 at JU. Special speakers include Dr. Christine Sapienza, Associate Dean of the JU College of Health Sciences and Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders, and Kimberly Beasley, JU Assistant Professor of Voice and NATS Chapter president.

The event for members of the NATS North Florida Chapter is unprecedented in that the Voice Area at JU is building a liaison with the new Speech-Language Pathology program in the JU College of Health Sciences, Beasley said.

Professors from schools such as JU, the University of North Florida and Florida State College at Jacksonville will be on hand, as well as instructors from as far away as Daytona Beach.

The speaker lineup is as follows:

11 a.m. – Dr. Christine Sapienza, Associate Dean of the JU College of Health Sciences, Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Jacksonville University – Vocal Health and Expiratory Strength Training.

12:45 p.m. – Dr. Carole Clifford, Visiting Professor at Stetson University – Tongue tension: Problems and solutions.

1:30 p.m., Panel Discussion – Kimberly Beasley, Assistant Professor of Voice, JU – Studio Building Blocks: Methods for the four-year development of a BFA.

2:15 p.m. – Dr. Anne Richie, mezzo-soprano and studio instructor – Career Longevity and the Professional Female Singer.

3 p.m., Panel Discussion – Transforming Singers into Better Musicians – methods and resources for ear training, sight singing and theory.

For more on the NATS North Florida Chapter, click here.

JU launches first undergraduate class in new Speech-Language Pathology program

The first undergraduate class in the JU College of Health Science’s new Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders is now under way, and it’s not just any course. It’s the bedrock on the pathway leading to other critical courses – and future careers – in speech-language pathology.

JU's Dr. Sharon DiFino

Dr. Sharon DiFino, assistant professor of Speech and Language Pathology in the new department, launched CSD 301 – Speech Anatomy and Physiology – this month with her first group of students, and is excited about helping lay the groundwork for undergraduate and future graduate work in speech-language pathology at Jacksonville University.

“This is one of the most crucial foundational courses in Communication Sciences Disorders,” she said. “Seven students were present for this historical event, and the majority expressed interest in pursuing CSD as a major at JU.”

JU recently hired national leader Dr. Christine Sapienza, chair for the past eight years of the University of Florida’s highly ranked department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, as associate dean of the College of Health Sciences, and she is building its speech pathology programs.

“I cannot be prouder of our JU department of CSD and of having Dr. DiFino as a core undergraduate teacher and advisor,” Sapienza said. “This is just the start for us; we are ready to grow as more of the community learns about our new program offerings.”

A master’s degree is generally required for a career in the growing speech-language pathology field, and JU is on track to fulfill the requirements for accreditation in order to begin the region’s first master’s degree in speech-language pathology by fall 2014.

“CSD 301 is the mortar in the foundation for clinical and therapeutic work in motor speech, swallowing disorders, feeding disorders and voice disorders because it provides an overview of anatomy, physiology and neurophysiology of the speech production mechanism,” DiFino said. “Students will thoroughly study the structure of the oral, laryngeal and respiratory systems for the production of sounds, swallowing and breathing.”

Knowledge gained from the class helps in the treatment of individuals with a broad range of disorders and diseases affecting the speech mechanism, such as Parkinson’s, MS, ALS, stroke and voice disorders, she added.

“Many of the students in this first class have different professional backgrounds and bring different life experiences to the program, something that contributes to a diverse JU campus,” DiFino said. “The students and I are all excited to be a part of the new Speech Pathology program at JU and look forward to serving the Jacksonville community as future speech and language pathologists and clinicians.”

For more about JU’s College of Health Sciences and its new Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, visit http://ju.edu/COHS.

JU’s Dr. Christine Sapienza speaks to members of Uptown Civitan Club

Dr. Christine Sapienza, new associate dean of JU’s College of Health Sciences, spoke recently to members of the Uptown Civitan Club at the University Club in downtown Jacksonville.

JU's Dr. Christine Sapienza (right) with Uptown Civitan Club President Karen Taylor.

Sapienza spent time detailing her efforts to build JU’s speech-language pathology programs, including the region’s first master’s degree in speech pathology, slated for fall 2014 pending accreditation.

A national leader in speech-language pathology, Sapienza was chair of the University of Florida’s department of speech language and hearing department, helping it become a top 10 department within the UF Health Science Center. She also holds a research career scientist title with the Malcolm Randall VA Brain Rehabilitation Research Center in Gainesville, where she leads a current clinical trial on Parkinson’s disease. Her research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation R&D Service, the Michael J. Fox Foundation and the non-profit CurePSP.

Uptown Civitan President Karen Taylor thanked member Iris Eisenberg “for bringing us such an interesting speaker.”

Meanwhile, Sapienza has been invited to the prestigious Dystonia Coalition’s Fifth Annual Meeting, “Research Priorities in Spasmodic Dysphonia,” in Atlanta, where will join an elite group of researchers and physicians Oct. 16-17 to discuss current issues including diagnostic and therapeutic trends for spasmodic dysphonia.

JU is currently offering the prerequisite courses in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders for students to meet the general course requirements prior to application to a master’s program in speech language pathology. For more information, visit http://bit.ly/13gpPei.

JU is seeking accreditation with the Council on Academic Accreditation to begin the graduate program in speech-language pathology. To see the proposed 2014 coursework for JU’s master’s degree in speech-language pathology, visit http://bit.ly/1dYdrVe. For more information on the degree overall, visit http://www.ju.edu/COHS/Pages/Masters-in-speech-pathology.aspx or call (904) 256-7281.

JU’s Dr. Christine Sapienza invited to speak at prestigious Dystonia Coalition’s Fifth Annual Meeting

Dr. Christine Sapienza, associate dean of JU’s College of Health Sciences and a Communication Sciences and Disorders professor, has been invited to the prestigious Dystonia Coalition’s Fifth Annual Meeting, “Research Priorities in Spasmodic Dysphonia,” in Atlanta.

Dr. Christine Sapienza

Sapienza joins an elite group of researchers and physicians Oct. 16-17 to discuss current issues including diagnostic and therapeutic trends for spasmodic dysphonia.  She was invited specifically to speak on quality of voice issues for those with the neurological voice disorder, as she is an expert on voice disorders. Sapienza will discuss misdiagnosis, voice symptoms, pitfalls of perceptual scaling and best practice assessment tools to use with spasmodic dysphonia cases.

“I’m honored to be invited to share what I’ve learned with nationally prominent researchers in the field,” Sapienza said. “We participate so patient care will continue to improve.”

The gathering is for the national planning committee of the Dystonia Medical Research Foundation (http://www.dystonia-foundation.org) and represents a select group of prominent researchers and physicians chosen to advise DMRF.

Ready for a Speech Language Pathology Career? FAQs, links to Prep Courses now online!

Considering a career in speech language pathology? A master’s degree is generally required to become a speech language pathologist. Speech-language pathologists work in schools, hospitals and private health offices and diagnose, treat and prevent a variety of communication disorders.

Jacksonville University is NOW offering the prerequisite courses in its new Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, in JU’s College of Health Science. These prerequisite courses are needed for students to meet the general course requirements prior to application to a master’s program in speech language pathology.

To get your questions answered and see the fall 2013 prep courses available now, visit http://bit.ly/13gpPei.

Students who hold a bachelor’s degree in a field that is not in Communication Sciences and Disorders, Speech Language Pathology or the equivalent must complete these prerequisite courses before they begin graduate work in Speech Language Pathology, regardless of the institution they attend for graduate school. The Fall 2013 JU undergraduate courses will combine face-to-face interaction with faculty and distance-learning modules.

Dr. Christine Sapienza

To see the proposed 2014 coursework for JU’s master’s degree in speech-language pathology, visit http://bit.ly/1dYdrVe.

Note: Jacksonville University is seeking accreditation with the Council on Academic Accreditation to begin the graduate program in speech-language pathology.

National leader Dr. Christine Sapienza, chair for the past eight years of the University of Florida’s highly ranked department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, started July 1 as associate dean of JU’s College of Health Sciences and will build its speech pathology programs. She looks forward to hearing from you. Contact her at csapien@ju.edu

For more information, visit http://www.ju.edu/COHS/Pages/Masters-in-speech-pathology.aspx or call (904) 256-7281.

 

JU now offering prep courses for Masters in Speech Pathology

Now offered at JU:

Preparatory Undergraduate Courses

For the Master’s degree in

Speech-Language Pathology

In the

New JU Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
College of Health Sciences 

Considering a career in Speech-Language Pathology? A master’s degree in speech pathology is generally required to become a speech-language pathologist. Speech-language pathologists work in schools, hospitals and private health offices and diagnose, treat and prevent a variety of communication, speech and language disorders.

Jacksonville University is NOW offering the prerequisite courses in Communication Sciences and Disorders. These prerequisite courses are needed for students to meet the general course requirements prior to application to a master’s program in speech-language pathology.

Students who hold a bachelor’s degree in a field that is not in Communication Sciences and Disorders, Speech-Language Pathology or the equivalent must complete these prerequisite courses before they begin graduate work in Speech-Language Pathology, regardless of the institution they attend for graduate school.

Dr. Christine Sapienza

(Note: Jacksonville University is seeking accreditation with the Council on Academic Accreditation to begin a graduate program in speech-language pathology. National leader Dr. Christine Sapienza, chair for the past eight years of the University of Florida’s highly ranked department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, starts July 1 as associate dean of JU’s College of Health Sciences and will build its speech pathology programs.)

The undergraduate JU courses will combine face-to-face interaction with faculty and distance-learning modules starting this fall semester 2013. The department of Communication Sciences and Disorders offers interested students the courses below.

For more information, visit http://www.ju.edu/COHS/Pages/Masters-in-speech-pathology.aspx or call (904) 256-7281.

________________________________________________________________

FALL 2013 COURSE OFFERINGS IN COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND DISORDERS 

CSD 200 Phonetics (3 cr). This course provides intensive training in the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet for transcribing American English in typical and disordered speech.

Learn the International Phonetic Alphabet, which was designed to represent only those qualities of speech that are distinctive in oral language and used to represent additional qualities of speech associated with speech disorders.

CSD 201 Speech and Language Development (3 cr). This course provides an overview of typical speech and language development.  This information provides a basis for understanding atypical development, delays, and disorders of speech and language in children.

Knowledge acquired provides a basis for understanding atypical development, delays, and disorders of speech and language in children. Discover the nature of how speech and language develop and the impact of learning on their development.

CSD 202 Intro to Speech Production Disorders (3 cr).  This course covers speech production disorders: articulation, motor speech, resonation, voice and dysfluency. 

Learn about the impact that diseases have on speaking, using language and communication.

CSD 300 Neuroanatomy (3 cr). This course defines the structures and functions of the human nervous system and the neurological processes involved in central and peripheral neurological disorders. Examine the central and peripheral nervous systems that support speech, language and communication.

CSD 301 Speech Anatomy & Physiology (3 cr). This course introduces elementary anatomy, physiology and neurophysiology of the speech production mechanism.

Study the structure of the oral, laryngeal and respiratory systems for production of sounds, swallowing and breathing.

CSD 400 Clinical Observation (1 cr). This course will serve to manage and track student observation hours that were completed with certified speech-language pathologists engaged in assessment and treatment of patients at clinical observation sites.

It is anticipated that students enrolled in the JU undergraduate hybrid courses will be required to be present in lecture on the JU campus approximately 4-6 sessions during the fall semester. The remaining course instruction will be delivered via JU’s Blackboard platform. Therefore, course instruction will be a combination of traditional classroom lecture integrated with the electronic platform. We look forward to having you in our classes!

 

 

JU President Cost discusses liberal arts, technical degree programs in Florida Times-Union

JU President Tim Cost is quoted in a Florida Times-Union story Sunday, June 30, about local universities’ commitment to liberal arts and technical degree programs.

JU President Tim Cost

“We are committed to offering a strong liberal arts core here,” said Cost, who earned a liberal arts degree from the university in 1981 and an MBA in finance from the University of Rochester in 1990. “Around that core, we know our students can benefit from the muscle of close-to-market degree programs.”

Here’s an excerpt:

Cost, who capitalized on his liberal arts background as well as his business skills during a 32-year corporate career, said there’s power in a strong foundation in both areas.

“The critical thinking and communications skills of the liberal arts, plus the practical and necessary skills needed for a student’s next step are vital, whether it’s into a career or into graduate school,” he said. “That combination can create our next generation of leaders.”

The story mentions that JU broke ground in June on its new $8 million College of Health Sciences building, designed to meet surging demand for its nursing graduates and other health care specialists. The college also recently hired national leader Christine Sapienza from the University of Florida to lead its new Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. Those are in addition to its other programs in aviation, business, marine sciences, orthodontics and public policy.

Read the entire article here.

JU launches exciting new era with groundbreaking of College of Health Sciences building

From left, JU Nursing faculty member Joyce McConnell, JU BSN 2011 graduate Buchra Watfa, JU President Tim Cost, JU Health Sciences Dean Judith Erickson, incoming JU Associate Health Sciences Dean Christine Sapienza and JU Nursing faculty member Jeane Richards break ground on the new $8 million College of Health Sciences building at Jacksonville University on Monday, June 3, 2013. Photo by Jacksonville University.

By Phillip Milano

More space, better facilities, state-of-the-art technology, the most well-prepared health care graduates and even stronger partnerships with the medical community were key highlights touted as Jacksonville University broke ground Monday, June 3, on its new $8 million College of Health Sciences building.

“This is a great day for JU and for Jacksonville as we move ahead on our priority to be a leader in health care education in this community,” JU President Tim Cost told onlookers assembled at the new building’s location between the Lazzara Health Sciences Center and Davis College of Business. “This new building will allow our Nursing, Speech Pathology, Orthodontics and future programs to have the critical space they need.”

JU has made the two-story, 30,000-square-foot structure a centerpiece of its bold $85 million ASPIRE comprehensive campaign, with the new building expected to open by August 2014. It is part of a larger, $20 million, phased plan to expand the College of Health Science’s facilities, programs, equipment and faculty to meet growing demand.

Cost announced Monday that funding for the building has been secured, and a contractor will be named soon. He praised the foresight and generosity of major donors Jack and Beverly Keigwin, Greg and Denise Nelson and Matt and Alexis Kane. Cost also announced that ASPIRE overall has raised more than $50 million toward its goals. (See full photo gallery of the groundbreaking event below.)

The new building will have advanced technology, dedicated classrooms, faculty and staff offices, meeting rooms, a multidisciplinary simulation learning center, a computer laboratory and more. It will use green technology and offer the latest in active learning environments, with classrooms designed to be reconfigurable for the most effective, engaging space and teaching styles.

“Today marks concrete evidence of JU’s commitment to realize the vision of the College of Health Sciences,” said college Dean Judith Erickson. “Our goal is to be the premiere provider of leading-edge health education in the region. We are creating the programs to meet the needs of our health care partners. Changing demographics and the new health care law mean our students will be prepared for the significant challenges that lie ahead.”

JU’s current health sciences facilities, in Lazzara and in temporary spaces, are bursting at the seams as demand for medical professionals accelerates locally and nationally. For example, student visits to its simulation labs have jumped four-fold since 2008, to more than 1,200. Between the 2007-08 and 2011-12 academic school years, more than 1,700 students obtained their BSN from JU, and another 106 received their MSN. In addition, JU’s Orthodontics program is the largest in the nation, graduating 15 students per year and treating thousands of patients annually at very low cost.

Dr. Christine Sapienza

About 1,600 students are now enrolled in the College of Health Sciences. With Nursing and Exercise Science program increases, and the addition of advanced-degree programs in Speech-Language Pathology, Health Executive Leadership, Occupational Therapy and Health Information Management, enrollment is projected to rise as much as 40 percent, to around 2,300 by 2016. This fall’s entering nursing class will be the largest in JU’s history: 67 new students are signed up, for a total of 260 total pre-licensure undergraduates, an increase from 235 in fall 2012. In addition, JU has more than 1,100 online nursing students, and more than 150 graduate nursing students.

JU partners with area providers such as Baptist, Mayo Clinic, Brooks, St. Vincent’s, Flagler Hospital, Wolfson and Nemours to provide hands-on training to JU students and also on-site education to these partners’ employees.

Jack Keigwin said he and his wife, Beverly, a trained nurse, were moved to help get the building off the ground when they saw what it could do for future students and for the region.

Dr. Judith Erickson

“We know there are many qualified students who just can’t get in because of the current space constraints,” he said. “Now so many more are going to graduate and do something special. This will contribute to the overall health care good of this community.”

Greg Nelson, meanwhile, noted that JU is “poised to do some phenomenal things on this campus, and the jewel in all of it is the College of Health Sciences.”

“We know it’s not hard to hire a nurse, but it’s tough to hire an excellent nurse,” he said. “JU can rise to national prominence with this new expanded college.”

JU Board of Trustees Chairman Fred Pruitt noted that area hospitals want JU’s nurses “above all else.”

“We are on a roll here at JU, and the College of Health Sciences is the most important project we have going.  I believe it’s our time here.”

Christine Sapienza, who starts July 1 as associate dean of the College of Health Sciences and will roll out JU’s new speech-language pathology advanced-degree programs, noted that the new space and multi-media classrooms mean JU’s new Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders will be positioned to offer the most rigorous curriculum in the area.

From left, donors Denise and Greg Nelson, Beverly and Jack Keigwin, and Alexis and Matt Kane.

“We will teach a continuum of care, from prevention to rehabilitation, and from infants to our aging population,” said Sapienza, a national leader in her field and chair for the past eight years of the University of Florida’s highly ranked department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences. “Together with our partner Brooks Rehabilitation, we will provide the faculty, resources and on-site and distance learning options to meet the needs of providers in this important field.”

Historically, JU has fed high-quality job candidates into the region, who stay in the area in high numbers, at high-paying jobs. JU’s first doctoral class (Doctor of Nursing Practice) began in fall 2011. Its Nursing graduates had a 98.65 percent passing rate on the state nursing licensure examination in 2012 (with a 100 percent pass rate for the last two cycles), and its Emergency Nurse Practitioner program is one of just five in the United States.

With the addition in the next several years of two health professional degrees (Speech-Language Pathology and Occupational Therapy) and two health administration programs (Health Executive Leadership and Health Information Management), JU will need additional laboratory and class space devoted solely to these students and faculty.

Buchra Watfa, who came to the U.S. from Syria in 2001 at age 15, received her BSN from JU in 2011 and now works at St. Vincent’s in the critical care area. She said the caring faculty at JU always emphasized that students should take steps forward in their learning – something she plans to do in the future with more education in the College of Health Sciences.

“This expansion should make a difference in JU’s life and in Jacksonville’s,” said Watfa, who was chosen by faculty at her graduation to receive the prestigious “Director’s Award” given to outstanding students. “This is so important to the area, and I’m so thankful for this.”

To see facts and renderings for the new college, view the .pdf below:

 

Incoming JU Health Sciences Associate Dean Christine Sapienza appears on “First Coast Connect”!

Dr. Christine Sapienza spent time with WJCT’s Melissa Ross this week discussing the importance of speech-language pathology as she starts up a new Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Jacksonville University.

Dr. Christine Sapienza

Sapienza, a national leader in the field, was chair for the past eight years of the University of Florida’s highly ranked department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences. She starts July 1 as associate dean of JU’s College of Health Sciences and will build the speech pathology programs.

“It’s an exploding field, and it’s exciting that students, whether incoming or transfers … can come to JU and become educated in a field where they can find employment,” said Sapienza, who added that speech pathology is a “top 20″ career growth field.

Joining Sapienza on First Coast Connect on Monday, May 20, was Jodi Morgan, clinical research liaison and a speech-language pathologist at Brooks Rehabilitation, which is a partner with JU in the speech pathology programs.

Sapienza mentioned that people often underestimate the challenges raised by communication disorders, but that so much advancement has occurred in the field that people with such challenges now have many options for rehabilitation.

Show host Ross brought up that Duval County Schools Superintendent Nikolai Vitti recently opened up about this own dyslexia, and Sapienza noted that JU looks forward to working with the public schools to help in the training and education of clinicians and speech pathologists to help students.

You can listen to the entire interview, which starts about 26 minutes into the program, at http://ondemand.wjct.org/audio/may-20-2013

National leader Christine Sapienza to lead speech-language pathology programs at JU College of Health Sciences

Dr. Christine Sapienza

Jacksonville University is bringing in a national leader in the field to start up and lead a new department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, with plans for the region’s first master’s degree in the key area of speech-language pathology by fall 2014.

Christine Sapienza will work directly with College of Health Sciences Dean Judith Erickson as they bring new curriculum, professional development opportunities and program innovations to JU.

Starting this fall, JU will open the new department to provide students and professionals who do not have the required background in those areas the prerequisite courses in human communication needed to pursue a master’s degree in speech-language pathology.

JU intends to develop a full undergraduate major for the program in the near future, with the intent to begin the master’s program in speech-language pathology as soon as the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) completes its current review for its candidacy application for accreditation.

Sapienza, PhD., chair for the past eight years of the University of Florida’s highly ranked department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, starts July 1 as associate dean of JU’s College of Health Sciences and will build the speech pathology programs.

At full speed, the program’s new faculty members, along with clinical speech pathologists and research staff from JU partner Brooks Rehabilitation, will work with Sapienza as her department moves toward an enrollment of about 30 new students in the program each year.

“Universities in Florida receive hundreds of applications from students annually trying to enroll in graduate speech-language pathology programs, but they can typically accept only 30 to 60 new students,” Sapienza said. “Jacksonville University is a premier institution to establish this new program that works in partnership with the region’s medical community and public school system, and I’m excited to be a part of it.”

JU President Tim Cost praised Sapienza as a well-recognized national leader in the speech-pathology field who will bring new ideas, energy and talent to the University.

“Dr. Sapienza instantly brings world-class experience and notoriety that will allow us to attract marquee faculty and superior students to establish JU regionally and nationally in the communications sciences,” he said. “It’s hard to overestimate how important her arrival is for us and for the entire area.”

Using a hybrid model that combines distance-learning modules, in-class teaching and contemporary learning methods, Sapienza and newly hired faculty will offer five core undergraduate courses starting in fall 2013 that provide the tools and knowledge in fundamental concepts of human communication sciences.

“It’s so fitting to make this announcement during Better Hearing and Speech Month, and I am thrilled to bring on and work with someone of the caliber of Christine Sapienza,” Erickson said. “She is known for her high energy and passion for the speech-language pathology field, and she places high value on the discipline and its future contribution to health care and the Jacksonville community. Her insights and reach in the field will ensure that JU establishes one of the leading programs in our state in such a highly marketable field.”

Speech-language pathologists are expected to experience high job growth opportunities in the next decade, with median national annual salaries ranging from $60,000 for SLPs in schools to $70,000 for those in health care settings, according to recent surveys by ASHA.

Several trends point to increased demand for speech-language pathologists, Sapienza said:

  • A growing older population means more people prone to medical conditions that result in speech, language and swallowing problems.
  • Medical advances are improving the survival rate of premature infants, individuals with developmental and physical disorders, people who have experienced head or neck trauma, and individuals who have sustained a stroke or other debilitating disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, all of whom are likely to need assessment and possible treatment by a speech-language pathologist.
  • An increased emphasis has been placed on early identification of speech and language problems in young children.
  • A wave of retirements of current professionals in the field is projected, and a high need is expected for SLPs in both urban and rural settings, as well as in medical settings and public schools.

Because of these and other trends, a report in June 2011 by ASHA using data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics showed the national employment rate of speech-language pathologists is expected to grow faster than average through 2018, with a 19 percent increase in job openings estimated between 2008-2018.

“With such a strong future projected for speech-language pathologists, JU has taken a leadership role by offering a modern education option for students that moves the training in this area up a notch,” Sapienza said. “These students will then be brought back into the fold locally. You’re going to see high-quality professionals filling a major need in the region, in the public schools, in medical centers, at long-term care facilities and more.”

For more information about the speech-language pathology program at JU’s College of Health Sciences, call (904) 256-7281.

About Christine Sapienza

Dr. Sapienza is a leader in the field of speech-language pathology. She served as chair of the University of Florida’s department of speech language and hearing department, helping it become a top 10 department within the UF Health Science Center, where she recruited scholars and high-achieving students as well as collaborated on innovative distance learning programs and initiated multiple interdisciplinary research collaborations.

Dr. Sapienza also holds a research career scientist title with the Malcom Randall VA Brain Rehabilitation Research Center in Gainesville, where she leads a current clinical trial on Parkinson’s disease. She has made significant scientific contributions in the area of voice and respiratory function for people with diseases, and has mentored more than 15 doctoral students now working successfully around the country and the world.

Sapienza’s research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation R&D Service, the Michael J. Fox Foundation and the non-profit CurePSP. She is also author of the graduate textbook “Voice Disorders” (Plural Publishing) and has published more than 100 peer-reviewed papers, as well as numerous book chapters and texts.